Incorporating Attractive Accessibility


A sinuous brick inlay in the entrance sidewalk references the meandering stone pathways you will find in the rear garden.  Those graceful motifs are much more than decorative features in this delightful suburban garden in this planned community.  The pathways provide durable and aesthetically pleasing disability access for owner Terry Nesbitt, who does not allow her use of a motorized wheelchair to restrict her access to and enjoyment of her entire garden.

This new, gated garden can be experienced from several vantage points.  Enjoy the views from the sheltered outdoor seating areas.  A three-sided alcove, which is connected to the house, affords vistas of the garden in any weather and is brightened by two skylights.  A folly with a cedar shake roof and cupola graces the garden, adding yet another restful perspective.  The garden’s centerpiece is a realistic stone waterfall that flows to a pond spanned by two bridges.  Water plants’ textural interplay adds interest to the flowing water.  Whimsical iron hollyhocks reign over a side bed.

Landscaping credit goes to Matthew Arnsberger and Rudy Leightner.


This garden is next door to the Warshaw garden.

© 2011-16 Chapel Hill Garden Club
Photographs courtesy Daphne McLeod, unless otherwise noted.